BROUN OF COLSTOUN & THORNYDYKES - Broun Clan Broun - Chief’s Arms: Gules, a chevron between three fleur-de-lis (Gold)

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The Broun Baronet - Coat Of Arms

 

The History of Arms - from “The Court Of The Lord Lyon” - who are the official heraldry office for Scotland and it deals with all matters relating to Scottish Heraldry, Coats of Arms and maintains the Scottish Public Registers of Arms and Genealogies.

 

The origin of the Coat of Arms was a jacket or tabard worn by a mediaeval Knight over his armour in order to identify himself to all others. Nowadays the expression "Coat of Arms" is generally applied to what is officially called an "Achievement", which consists of various parts: a shield, helmet, mantling, wreath, crest, motto and sometimes supporters and decorations.

 

There is a widespread misconception that a family or a clan can have a family or clan “Coat of Arms”. Many heraldic and clan web sites and other media suggest that a person has the right to use the family or clan “Arms”. From the Court of the Lord Lyon, this is completely incorrect.

 

A Coat of Arms belongs only to one individual person and can only be used by that person and no one else. In order for a person to be able to use a Coat of Arms it is necessary for that individual person to apply for a personal Coat of Arms to be granted to him or her .

 

What is permitted is for a member of a clan to use the clan crest . Usually what is referred to as the clan Coat of Arms is in fact the personal Arms of the chief of the clan which can only be used by the chief.

 

Clansmen and Clanswomen

 

It is recognised that these are the Chiefs relatives, including his own immediate family and even his eldest son, and all members of the extended family called the "Clan", whether bearing the Clan surname or that of one of its septs; that is all those who profess allegiance to that Chief and wish to demonstrate their association with the Clan.

 

Important Note:

 

It is correct for these people to wear their Chiefs Crest encircled with a strap and buckle bearing their Chief’s Motto or Slogan. The strap and buckle is the sign of the clansman, and he demonstrates his membership of his Chiefs Clan by wearing his Chief’s Crest within it